New Orleans in Two Days During COVID 19

The Canal Street Inn is close to the French Quarter (2.4 miles) if you would like to visit it, but today you will learn about many other sites that New Orleans has to offer. We are located in Mid City the Heart of New Orleans, Easily accessible by the Red Line Canal Street Car which stops directly across the street from our Inn, today I will give you ideas of things to see and do around New Orleans

I recommend you purchase a day pass on any bus or Streetcar, and it is good for 24 hours on any RTA bus or Streetcar. The cost is $3.00. Please remember on the Streetcars and buses in Nola you need exact change or a pass.  If you have a smartphone, you can also download the app  RTA GoMobile 2.0

Day One

Your morning will start with a Full Southern Style breakfast at the Canal Street Inn. Then you can enjoy a bike ride or a short ride on the streetcar, to many destinations. The red line streetcar stops in front of the bed and breakfast. It can take you downtown, the cemeteries, or City park.

City Park

City Park is full of all sorts of sights, from the Spanish moss-draped giant live oaks to the New Orleans Museum of Art to the Sculpture Garden, to pedal boats on the lake. The kids’ amusement park, Storybook Land, and  Louisiana’s oldest Children’s museum have a shiny new home with spaces for kids of all ages. The lush Botanical Gardens include the Train Gardens, a sort of melted Dr. Seuss replica of the city in miniature, complete with model trains (not to mention large lily pads).   Please visit https://noma.org/ for more information

The Cemeteries

Metairie, Canal Street, Greenwood, Odd Fellows, and Hurricane Katrina Memorial Cemetery are easily reached by the #47 red Canal Street Streetcar (the one that reads “cemeteries” on the front.  They are less than a mile away

Metairie Cemetery         

 A stunning 65-acre cemetery built on a former horse-racing track. When it was dedicated in 1872, the trend in cemeteries in the Eastern United States was toward rural memorial parks with landscaped grounds, lakes, and pathways.

Canal Street Cemeteries These include Cypress GroveGreenwoodOdd Fellows Rest, and Old Charity Hospital/Katrina Memorial Cemetery.

Old Charity Hospital Cemetery was established in 1848 as a burial place for unidentified people. Therefore, there are no markers at all in this cemetery.

After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, 83 victims of the storm and its aftermath remained unidentified and were interred here.

Cypress Grove contains several interesting tombs, including the Soon on Tong tomb, erected in 1904 as a temporary resting place for Chinese people who died in New Orleans, before their remains were shipped to China.  

Greenwood, one of the city’s largest cemeteries at 150 acres, boasts at its entrance the impressive Elks tomb and Firemen’s Monument.  You will also see many cast-iron tombs in Greenwood.

Bayou St John

Just outside the gates of City Park lies, this former bustling canal turned the scenic body of water. A stroll here is one of the lesser-known delights of the city. Stand outside the Pitot House and imagine owning one of the former plantation homes around here. Keep your eyes peeled for local wildlife, like herons, pelicans, nutria — and kayakers.

Right off the Bayou, Parkway Bakery and Tavern has some of the best Po’ boys (and atmosphere) in town. 538 Hagan St. tel. 504-482-3047

Relax and Renew

We will be happy to set you up with a Massage Therapist.  Our Therapists are trained to provide Lymphatic, Prenatal, TMJ, relaxation massage, Sports Massage. Please let us know ASAP. Laurie will love to set you up.

Day Two

Let’s start again with a Full Southern Breakfast

Take the #47 or 48 Redline streetcar to Canal and Carondolet and transfer to the St Charles streetcar line (green #12) to the end, and then return back to Canal Street on the same St Charles line.

Walking Tour of Esplanade Avenue

Architecturally similar to the Garden District, the area includes at least one home with a French connection — the birthplace of Impressionist Edgar Degas’s mother and grandmother, and the only studio belonging to the former artist that is open to the public.

At the end of the tour, you can take the #91 bus marked Jackson Esplanade back to the Quarter.

St. Charles Avenue Streetcar

Hop on the oldest continuously operating wooden streetcar in the country — and that means no air-conditioning (or wheelchairs), so doing this in the cool of the morning is a good idea. Admire the gorgeous homes along the way and remember which side of the car you rode on so that you can get on the other side for the ride back.

Take a Walking Tour of the Garden District

Aside from its historical significance and interest, this neighborhood, full of fabulous houses and lush greenery, is just plain beautiful. Contrast the plain exteriors of the “French” Quarter with these grand, ornamented “American district” spectacles. Free Garden District Tour

Lafayette Cemetery No. 1

The “little cities of the dead” are part of the iconic landscape of New Orleans. But this cemetery, which catered to the Uptown folks, is perhaps prettier, thanks to the foliage and the more extensive square footage. (Like many of the cemeteries, it is in great need of maintenance, and there are limited funds to do so.) Notice the tombs with French or German writing, and the four matching mausoleums in the far left corner, which belong to four boyhood friends (one a Civil War Vet) who used to play together in that corner of the graveyard.

Sample the Nightlife

Once you’ve eaten, if you go to Mid City Lanes –formally known as Rock ‘n’ Bowl — you can bowl as well as listen to some zydeco and other local music. Or head to Tipitina’s, or the Maple Leaf Bar, or Frenchmen Street, paying particular attention to the Spotted Cat and d.b.a. for more local music.

For Dinner, you can visit many of our local neighborhood restaurants, bars, and grills. I will be happy to make reservations or recommendations for you.

Big Thank you to  https://www.frommers.com/destinations/new-orleans/suggested-itineraries/in-two-days

for some of the information and ideas to write this newsletter.

07/16/2020

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